Welcome back, everyone, and I hope you had a good summer vaction. Having survived English 1C, you are now the proud inhabitants of English 1D, which is also generally about oral communication. The aims of this course include providing students with opportunities to (a) use oral English skills obtained prior to entering the university, (b) extend that knowledge through a variety of speaking and listening activities, and (c) gain confidence in their ability to function in English both inside and outside the academic community of the university.

In this term we will again be using our textbook, of course, and you'll find some supplementary material below. Much further down this page you'll find the second major undertaking of this term, the group research project.

The Basics ...

English 1D syllabi: advanced and regular

Write a polite e-mail

Intermediate Level (M2)

 Breakthrough Plus (Craven) 

This section includes random—yet somehow related—links from the units in our textbook, Breakthrough Plus by Miles Craven. Enjoy!

 Unit 6 — Celebrations 
How appropriate to consider celebrations inasmuch as today is a "holiday" for us. I believe it's "Worker Gratitude Day", which in the US is simply known as Labor Day. In the US, Labor Day is considered to be the end of summer and occurs on the first weekend in September. Generally the new school year begins after Labor Day, too, so students are sad, of course.

On a more timely note, on the 4th Thursday in November we will have will mark Thanksgiving, which is a formal holiday in the US best known as the day when turkey is eaten. It is also the date of a wondrful parade in New York, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

In our textbook you'll find reference to the Dragon Boat Festival in China.

 Unit 7 — Food & Drink 
Ah, what better way to spend a day than with a jug of wine, a loaf of bread, and thou? (a fine line, very romantic, yes?)

Here, for your enjoyment, is a mouthwatering clip about food in France, which is a cuisine that (I suspect) we all enjoy. As you likely know, French cuisine has a remarkably large amount of such rich ingredients as cheese and cream, yet the rate of obesity is far, far lower than it is for Americans.

 Unit 8 — Rules 
Here we have a ...

 Unit 9 — Adventures 
Let's begin with a look at rather tame adventures. Many of you are likely familiar with World Heritage Sites, of which there are many. How many, you ask? To answer that question, you might well visit the WHS homepage, where you'll find both an extensive list as well as an interactive map.

 Unit 10 — Health 
Ah, that bugaboo of winter, the common cold. We all seem to catch one (or two) occasionally, and I suspect most people have a "sure-fire" remedy or two that will take care of a cold. Here in Japan we also find a somewhat unusual use for a piece of surgical equipment; in the video clip to the left you'll find out more (although you might already know much, much more than I do about this particular subject!).

 Class Maps 

Here, good people, are links to our respective class maps.

Advanced Level (M1)

Discussion Strategies (Kehe & Kehe)

This section includes random—yet somehow related—links from the units in our textbook, Discussion Strategies by David and Peggy Kehe. Enjoy!

Unit 11 — Memories  
Missing your memories from early childhood? Brain overload might be the culprit (here as a Word document).

Unit 12 — Telling Lies 

If you click on image to the left of the hand with crossed fingers, you'll be carried away to Pamela Meyer's YouTube talk on "How to spot a liar."

This essay by Maria Konnikova in The New Yorker explores how to tell when someone is lying, which would be an extraordinarily useful skill if one were able to do so.

Here, Good People, we have an interesting essay from The New York Timeson the surprisingly large cost of telling small lies in the business world.

Unit 13 — Describing Things 
Bonus points for you if you can explain "yada-yada"! Here we have some useful expressions for describing things, courtesty of Yada-Yada English.

 Unit 14 — Superstitutions 
Courtesy of the fine folks at Mental Floss (go ahead and give some thought to that name), here is a look at some of the various superstitutions that different cultures have.

 Unit 15 — French Cuisine 
Here, for your enjoyment, is a mouthwatering clip about food in France, which is a cuisine that (I suspect) we all enjoy. As you likely know, French cuisine has a remarkably large amount of such rich ingredients as cheese and cream, yet the rate of obesity is far, far lower than it is for Americans.

Our next topic is, in particular, near and dear to my heart. Of course, that would be the 'staturally challenged' (i.e., short) state that I have always enjoyed. I certainly don't mind since I've always been short—go ahead and guess where I was in every one of my class photos in elementary school. At any rate, some research has looked at the issue of shortness and, more specifically, at how perceptions change when one is 'height-challenged'.

 Unit 18 — Bigger is Better 
As you'll read in Unit 18, in Africa (specifically, Mauritania) a woman is considered more beautiful if she is large. In many other countries, thinner is generally considered more attractive, and we see this in the trend of fashion models being generally very slender and sometimes almost anorectically so. However, in Mauritania the opposite is true, and there has long been a custom there of forcefeeding girls to make them fatter and therefore more attractive as a marriage partner.

 Unit 19 — Catching Colds 
Ah, that bugaboo of winter, the common cold. We all seem to catch one (or two) occasionally, and I suspect most people have a "sure-fire" remedy or two that will take care of a cold. Here in Japan we also find a somewhat unusual use for a piece of surgical equipment; in the video clip to the left you'll find out more (although you might already know much, much more than I do about this particular subject!).

Group Research Project

As you will know from class, you and your group members will be conducting a research project this term. Here is the basic outline of the group research project from class.

Second, you will recall that I introduced some projects that my students conducted in years past. Feel free to have a look as you think about topics your group's project. This handy button will take you there:

Your next task, people: your group will send me one e-mail to introduce your topic and explain your decision. Of course, your e-mail will be written in polite English, and the details of your topic will be in an attachment to that e-mail, which should arrive before our next class.

Just a reminder: your attachment MUST have a correct filename.

Task #2: By November 30 I would like to receive a preliminary report about your progress. As you'll remember from class, here is an example of a preliminary report, and you'll also find some and must include comments here (please look at this carefully). I encourage you to also add images (i.e., screenshots) where appropriate.

International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

As you know from our class discussion, ...

A wealth of information about the IPA, courtesy of Omniglot, the online encyclopedia of writing systems and languages.

Here is the phonetics webpage from the University of Iowa that we checked in class. Very cool animation here, people.

Here you'll find the homepage of the International Phonetic Association.

Riddles, Mysteries, and More

Treverton (2007) Risks and riddles

As you'll know from our class discussion, riddles at times give rise to conspiracy theories, some of which have remarkable longevity. Click here for quite a list of conspiracies (with photos), courtesy of the good people at The Telegraph.

To the right is a video clip of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (with his dog, Paddy) speaking about both Sherlock Holmes and his belief in spiritualism.

Should you ever feel the need to immerse yourself in the Sherlock Holmes canon, you can find feel free to drop by the Holmes bookshelf here on my webpage.

Writing

As you know from class, I require polite email. Recall, too, that if you send me a file, the filename has a certain form.

Here's an example of the report style that you should use.

Class maps

URL: www.jimelwood.net/students/meiji/english1C/english1C.html

Logos are courtesy of Cool Text.

Date last updated: October 3, 2016 * Copyright 2016 by Midas, Cyrus, and all the other lunatics.